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Geocaching Fitness and Fun

posted Jun 1, 2016, 9:33 AM by Greg Jewett   [ updated Jun 1, 2016, 10:14 AM ]
Reposted due to problems reading the original content from the website.   Be careful following the link, as it behaves weird on most browsers.

From Julie L., she passed this link on with the following note:
I volunteer with a children's group, where I help plan different events. We are starting a geocaching club, so I wanted to find some interesting resources to get the kids excited about it. Thanks for all the help!

My daughter, Maddie, found a great resource on geocaching: http://www.gentledentalwestchester.com/geocaching-fitness-and-fun/ . Can you include this in your list of links?  She loves the outdoors, but her friends don't share her enthusiasm, so I thought her sharing online would give her some extra encouragement. :-) And we thought your other visitors would find it useful.

If you have any tips for our group, feel free to pass them on, and thanks again! :-)


Geocaching Fitness and Fun

Anyone searching for an outdoor activity that involves physical exercise and exploration might enjoy geocaching. The word “geocaching” comes from combining the words “geography” and “cache.” Using a hand-held global positioning system device or a smartphone with a geocaching app installed on it, you can search for hidden caches or objects. With more than 2.5 million caches hiding around the world, it’s likely that at least a few of these objects are hidden near your home or in the vicinity of your next vacation. Not only is geocaching an exciting adventure suitable for people of virtually any age, but it’s also a way to get healthful exercise and learn about geography.

Geocaching websites list the caches located in specific places. These databases also include ratings for the difficulty of finding them in the surrounding terrain to enable people to determine whether they think they have the fitness ability necessary to find each cache. This can be especially advantageous for families with children. With a GPS device, a person or a group can begin hunting for the cache. It’s also helpful to have a compass and a map of the area to assist with the search. You might be searching in an urban neighborhood or busy downtown area or in a rural spot such as the woods or an open field. The trick involves following the GPS coordinates because the coordinates will show a straight line between you and the cache. However, natural and man-made barriers will usually necessitate making detours before you arrive at the cache.

Not only is geocaching an entertaining individual or group activity, but it also has other benefits. Anyone who goes on a group geocaching expedition will usually experience excitement and pride upon finding the cache successfully as a team. The process of hiking or walking around outdoors is also a valuable type of physical exercise. Geocaching in the wilderness may even involve climbing or hiking, which involves more effort. It’s possible to choose the level of exertion involved in geocaching by selecting the cache carefully. For example, a cache located in an urban city location will probably not involve as much physical effort as one hidden in the foothills of a national park.

Geocaching also has educational benefits. Hunting for a cache in a historical area will enable you to explore this environment to learn more about it. The cache itself may also contain items of historical significance. Teachers are using geocache activities as fun and educational lessons for students. Setting up temporary caches on outdoor school grounds lets students search for them as they learn facts about a historical time or event.

Geocaching etiquette includes some basic guidelines to help everyone enjoy this adventure. One of the first rules of etiquette involves removing something from a cache you find. It’s only polite to take something away from a cache if you leave something of your own behind in it for the next person to find. Even if you don’t remove anything from it, you might want to consider leaving a trinket of your own behind to add to the cache. Geocachers also must always record their find in the logbook of the cache.

Learn more about geocaching, how to do it, and the many benefits associated with this activity by visiting the following resources:


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